Saving the Miller’s House

Below are photos from a visit I made along with other members of Historic Easton to the Miller’s House in what is now Wye Mills back in April. The Miller’s House was built by Edward Lloyd III in the 1700s to attract a miller to the area as local agriculture transitioned from tobacco-based to grain-based.

After sitting vacant for years, the home has fallen into quite a state of disrepair. Historic Easton is trying to stabilize the house before it falls down. While we have grants to help cover some of the work, we are seeking support from anyone interested to help offset costs (donations can be made via Paypal to historiceaston@gmail.com).

Click on the photos below to view larger versions:

The Miller’s House, perched on a hill above the Wye Mill’s area in Talbot County, Md. A security fence has since been constructed to protect the house.

A closer view of the other side of the house.

There is significant damage to this side of the house, which was compounded by last year’s earthquake.

Close-up view of some of the damage to the exterior wall.

Various means are being employed to keep the walls from moving any further.

Supports also are holding up the floors. This picture was taken in the basement of the house.

This hook is embedded in the ceiling of the basement. A woman whose aunt used to live in the home said that the family lived in the basement during the summer because it was cooler.

Brickwork in the basement.

Closer view of the brickwork.

A piece of pottery in the rubble outside of the house.

There is a cemetery on the property — I’ll be helping to map out the gravestones when the weather cools and vegetation dies back.

Cemetery on the property.

A piece of pottery in the cemetery.

Pottery fragment on the ground outside of the home.

Another pottery fragment.

Snake sunning itself on the brick exterior of the home.

 

Debris on steps outside of the house shows the color that one of the porches used to be.

5 thoughts on “Saving the Miller’s House

  1. Fantastic. Keep us posted. This is an important project indeed.

  2. Sam Neal says:

    My great, great grandfather, Thomas Hopkins, would have lived in that house.

  3. Sam Neal says:

    Thanks for your great work. Thomas Hopkins would have owned it, 1836-1845, selling it to his nephew, John R. Hopkins. I’m thinking, my great grandmother, Sarah A. Hopkins Neal,b. 1837, might have been born in that house. Both of them are buried over at Skipton in an obscure family plot by 50 and south of Skipton Landing Rd. We may have a picture of that house from a couple of old photo albums of my grandfather, John Richardson Hopkins Neal, born in Skipton.

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