Follow Friday: AIIP Conference Tweets

Next week (April 7-10) is the 25th Annual Association of Independent Information Professionals Conference in Vancouver, WA. Be sure to follow #aiip11 on Twitter to keep up with all the sessions. Several genealogists are members of AIIP and I encourage anyone who has a genealogy business or who is thinking of starting one to look into this group. The conference is just one of the many benefits of joining. You’ll get a taste of what you can learn from this wonderful group by following conference tweets.

Still need convincing? Take a look at my recap of last year’s conference.

RootsTech Redux

I’ve been spending the evening cleaning up my previous posts about RootsTech, which I wrote on-scene using an iPad with limited skill/ability to do things like link links and include images. Here’s the full list, in case you’d like to revisit the posts or you are seeing them for the first time:

RootsTech, Day 1: Toto, we’re not at FGS anymore.

RootsTech, Day 2.0: “Genealogy is about the experience and not proper citation format. People don’t keep doing things that make them miserable.”

RootsTech, Day 2.1: Digital Images for Genealogists

RootsTech, Day 2.2: Digitization of Irish Records

RootsTech, Day 2.3: Still more from Day 2!

RootsTech, Day 3.0: Notes from the founder of Internet Archive

RootsTech, Day 3.1: Photography Brings Ancestors to Life

RootsTech, Day 3.2: Virtual Presentations How-To

Random RootsTech Photos: exactly as advertised

I had such an excellent time at this conference. I love the chance to get to know the bloggers with whom I correspond online and I learned a lot at the various sessions. The chance to use the legendary Family History Library was fabulous.

This event had the vibe of the larger library association conferences I’ve been known to frequent. Rock music was used to introduce the keynote speakers. It also had its very own touches that really made it standout. There were recording booths in the vendor hall that bloggers could use to record video interviews. Microsoft set up a gaming area with Kinect video games, pool tables and more. All three keynote sessions were broadcast live on the Internet along with several breakout sessions. It was rather unreal.

Tweeting and blogging was encouraged and even expected — live tweets were featured on the conference homepage. Developers hung out with genealogists and brainstormed. Bending the rules and creative thinking were the norm.

It’s amazing that this event came together after only seven months. And 3,000 people came. 3,000! Some from as far away as Ireland and Australia.

I’m so excited that they’ve already picked the dates for next year: February 2-4, 2012. You can bet I’ll be there!

RootsTech, Day 3.2 – Virtually There

The last official breakout session that I attended was a roundtable on how to host virtual presentations. Thomas MacEntee led the session, which featured several familiar faces on stage and familiar voices joining virtually.

The session covered everything from what technologies to use (GoToMeeting was mentioned several times and was used to facilitate this particular session) to how to prep for such a presentation both as a speaker and as an attendee.

This type of presentation has become more and more popular in other spheres, but genealogy societies have struggled to offer such sessions either due to a lack of know-how, a lack of funds or a fear that it will leave out less tech-savvy members.

The message from the speakers was that virtual presentations are doable on any budget (partner with a venue like a library if your society doesn’t have the technology) and can be held in such a way that members who want to attend in-person can do so.

There are many reasons for holding virtual presentations–it can make the society accessible to far-flung members and can attract speakers who are unable to travel to the society’s location.

To quote Lisa Louise Cooke, who took part in the panel, “the genealogy landscape is going to change.” Societies need to step up and change with the times or risk becoming irrelevant.

Random RootsTech Photos

I still have at least one more substantive RootsTech post to write based on the sessions I attended, but I finally downloaded some photos off of my camera so here are some relatively random pics from my trip.

I did a pretty horrible job of taking pics of other people at the conference, and so encourage you to check out the other folks blogging about the conference for people shots.

Nifty shot of another plane as seen from seat 13F on the flight to SLC.

The view from my hotel room. That's the roof of the Family History Library in the foreground!!!

Fantastic chocolate shake from JB's restaurant (attached to the Plaza Hotel). I also highly approved of the mini Belgian waffles at their Sunday breakfast buffet (no pic of those, sorry).

Fireworks by the state capitol. I never did find out what they were for...

Slightly less blurry fireworks shot.

Sunday’s Obituary: Della (Crow) Hayes

Dear Reader: Do you think you are related to the individuals listed in this post? Please drop me a note! I love hearing from cousins and others researching my family!

Della (Crow[e]) Hayes was my great-grandmother. All of the materials below are in the possession of one of my aunts:

Original source unknown

Original source unknown

Funeral Program Cover

Funeral Program, Inside

I have a couple things to follow up on here. There is a minister involved in the funeral of the last name ‘Hayes.’ Possibly a relative? Same with pall bearer Wayne Gourley (note the difference in spellings of Gourley/Gorley throughout the materials). I should also check with the church mentioned in the obituary to see if they have any family records.

Scrapbooking Marathon II

I was pretty busy this weekend, owing to an 11-hour scrapbooking crop down in Fredericksburg, Va., that I attended. I went to the same event last year for the first time.

My mission for 2010: finish disassembling a K-12 scrapbook that my mom started for me and that I took over when I was old enough. It had been falling apart for years because of how much I tried to stuff into it and how often I paged through it. I finished rescuing the material from it and arranged the photos, mementos and school records into 12×12 scrapbooking pages for assembling into an album. Now, all I need to do is journal throughout the book and add some finishing touches.

Eleven hours is a loooooong time to sit in one place, but there was plenty to do around the convention center. The organizers put hundreds of scrapbooking layouts on display and attendees could walk around to take photos and get ideas for their own albums. I’m including some genealogy/family-history related layouts below (click on the photos to see a larger version of each):

Below are a couple of spreads from a fabulous genealogy scrapbook assembled digitally that was on display as well:

 

This family history album included photos and scanned documents.

 

To see more photos from the event, including some really funny layouts, visit my Flickr page.