Surname Saturday: HAYES (TN, NC) — An Update

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In 2009, I posted about the discovery of notes on the back of a photograph, which identified my second-great grandparents, Joseph and Molly (Taylor) HAYES of Carter County, Tennessee. Census records showed that Joseph was born in North Carolina. Eventually, I tracked down his father, Robert, also born in N.C.

Well, I finally have located the family in North Carolina (Watauga County, to be specific), using the 1860 U.S. census. The surname was spelled Hays. That breakthrough allowed me to trace them back yet another generation. My 4th-great grandfather was Ransom Hayes. In the 1850 U.S. census, the enumerator spelled the surname ‘Hase.’ Tricky, but I found them anyhow! (Also found Ransom listed as Hayse in 1860!)

I noticed that another Ancestry member had a private photo of Ransom’s tombstone. I plan to contact them, but on a hunch I went to FindaGrave and sure enough, there are photos of his tombstone and that of his wife (and now I know her surname too)! And his tombstone has interesting information on it that points to possible land records for which to search. Oh and they’re buried in a HAYES cemetery in Watauga County, N.C. This just keeps getting better!

Wordless Wednesday: Joseph & Mollie Hayes

My great-great grandparents, Joseph and Mollie (Taylor) Hayes (née Mary Evelyn Taylor)

The back of the photo, with notes in my grandma’s handwriting (Wm. E. Hayes was my great-grandfather).

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Military Monday: Billy Hayes

I recently discovered that I have another relative buried at Arlington National Cemetery. My great-uncle Billy G. Hayes was interred there in 2002. He served in the Army. I’m still trying to flesh out the details of his service. A note on his FindaGrave record reads “CSM US ARMY; WORLD WAR II; KOREA; VIETNAM.” CSM apparently stands for Command Sergeant Major. On my next trip to Arlington, I plan to seek out his grave. My father and my maternal grandparents are all buried at Arlington as well.

In 2009, Billy’s brother, my great-uncle Ben Hayes, mentioned to me that he had purchased a brick in Billy’s honor for a war memorial in Elizabethton, Tennessee, where they grew up. Ben drove my sister and I by the memorial at the time, though we didn’t get a chance to see the brick itself.

Sunday’s Obituary: Della (Crow) Hayes

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Della (Crow[e]) Hayes was my great-grandmother. All of the materials below are in the possession of one of my aunts:

Original source unknown

Original source unknown

Funeral Program Cover

Funeral Program, Inside

I have a couple things to follow up on here. There is a minister involved in the funeral of the last name ‘Hayes.’ Possibly a relative? Same with pall bearer Wayne Gourley (note the difference in spellings of Gourley/Gorley throughout the materials). I should also check with the church mentioned in the obituary to see if they have any family records.

Sunday’s Obituary — William E. HAYES

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New year, new-to-me blog theme! Below is a memorial obituary printed for the funeral of one of my maternal great-grandfathers, William E. Hayes. The memorial belongs to one of my aunts, who allowed me to photograph it last year.

Memorial Obituary for William E. Hayes

HAYES Headstone

Gravestone for William E. Hayes

SNGF: The Time Machine

Here is tonight’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun mission from Randy Seaver:

1) Determine which event in your ancestral history that you would love to be a witness to via a Time Machine. Assume that you could observe the event, but not participate in it.

2) Tell us about it in a blog post of your own, in a comment to this blog post, or in a comment on Facebook.

I would love to travel back to the early 1900s when my great-great-grandfather Joseph Smith HAYES moved his entire family from Carter County, Tennessee, to Umatilla County, Oregon, where they can be found in the 1910 U.S. Census. By 1920, they were all back in Carter County.

I’m curious as to why they traveled (I’m guessing for work) and what it was like to travel cross-country and back at that time.

FGS Day 2

Just back from an even fuller (more full?) day at the FGS conference. Started bright and early at the FamilySearch.org Blogger’s Breakfast where they debuted some upcoming features (new catalog search functionality and ancestor pages) and then asked me and about 14 other bloggers for opinions on various FamilySearch.org initiatives. The session was well worth the early start time — thanks to FamilySearch for the invite and the free swag (a NGS DVD, USB hub, brochures, and a lovely breakfast).

The official opening session of the conference was a riot. Mark Lowe and Kent Wentworth traded jibes, jokes and stories in a fun Tennessee v. Kentucky match-up. They also shared some ideas for doing research in both states. The exhibit halls opened after the session and I think I did pretty well, only spending $20 on items when there was so much there for the taking/buying. For those curious, I bought RootsMagic4 and the guidebook as a package deal after chatting with the helpful staff at their table.

I then attended a session on tracing immigrant ancestors to their countries of origin. This session was packed full of strategies and resources to try. It gave me hope for the searches I have ahead of me for my British, Scottish and German ancestors.

After lunch with Amy Coffin, Tonia Hendricks, Tina Lyons and her husband, I headed to a two-hour session by Elizabeth Shown Mills on Southern Research Strategies, especially for tracing the stories of poor, black and female ancestors. She presented two case studies that were complex and fascinating. She used a bullseye strategy, beginning with the ancestor at their earliest known/proved place of residence, slowly working out in concentric circles by studying their family, neighbors and acquaintances to search for evidence.

After that, I reunited with Amy and Tonia and a couple of other GeneaBloggers for the Genealogy Guys Podcast taping. They took questions from the audience and provided strategies for busting through brickwalls or approaching new areas. It was a really fun session and I think could be a model for future activities — with or without the podcast aspect.

After the podcast, Amy and I headed out to Market Square (the skies had cleared!) and talked shop over yummy food. Then I departed for the East Tennessee Family History Center, which has been kind enough to extend their hours this week while we’re in town.

I have family from Carter County in East Tennessee. After talking with the ETFH folks at the exhibit hall this morning, I wanted to check out the indexes for two of their journals to see if any of my surnames were covered. When I arrived after dinner, a staff member at the reference desk mentioned that they also had compiled genealogies. I made a beeline for that room and requested the vertical files they had on the HAYES surname and paged through a Carter County scrapbook while I waited for the records to be pulled. Most of the staff I encountered were nice, but one curmudgeonly guy was obviously put out by my newbie visitor questions. Harumph right back to him.

I didn’t find any real answers on this visit because I was pressed for time before they closed, but I noted the other vertical files they have available for a future visit. I also began searching through the indexes of the East Tennessee publications in their holdings. I’m looking forward to my next visit to the area so I can follow-up on what I saw today (and may even try to play hooky from a session or two tomorrow or Saturday to do more research).