Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 53-59

Some very intriguing images in this next set, as we near the end of the second album:

Photo 53

I recognize at least one person in the photo above. The gentleman front and center was featured several times in Album 1 including here and here (also here). My guess is that’s our star’s dad. Who are the women? Several women also were featured in Album 1. For instance, her and her. Are they in the photo above? Unfortunately, there are no notations on the above photo to offer further clues.

I think the guy below is holding tire. There is a pump in the foreground:

Photo 54

There is a clue on the back of his photo:

Reverse of Photo 54

This photo was printed at Sweigart’s in York, Pennsylvania! You know that I went straight to Google with that little tidbit. What luck! There’s is a web page devoted to this photography shop on a web site about preserving York’s history! How neat to get the back story. The information may prove helpful in dating this photo.

Not only that, but I also found a web page on the same site about a dam near York. Could Indian Rock Dam be that pictured in yesterday’s post? Hmmm… the one in yesterday’s post looks too wide to be Indian Rock Dam. Damn!

On to the next photo:

Photo 55

I think the child above is the same pictured on the left here.

Photo 56 presents us with a skyline. Anyone recognize it?

Photo 56

I know we were just talking about York, but I think this might be Harrisburg, based on an image search on Google… Anyone know?

Photo 57 is a slightly different view of the same skyline:

Photo 57

Photo 58 is a nifty shot of a ferry either coming into a dock or departing from one.

Photo 58

I’ve tried to read the name of the boat without any luck. Bummer!

Photo 59 is equally interesting. At first, I thought the contraption on the right was some type of plane. On closer inspection, you can see that it’s a tower somehow anchored into the surf. I almost wonder if it’s a type of amusement ride — maybe swings over the water? Anyone ever see anything like this before?

Photo 59

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 46-52

More riverside photos in this next set:

Photo 46

Photo 47

Any guesses as to what the contraption is in the image above?

Photo 48

The above might not make much sense, but will be explained a bit a couple of photos down.

Photo 49

I imagine that towers like these were quite a new phenomenon when the above photo was taken.

Photo 50

Anyone know which dam this might be?

Photo 51

Back in D.C. — a destination in Album 1. The above is a photo of the Lincoln Memorial, which opened to the public in 1922 (construction began in 1914). This information helps to date the photo.

Photo 52

Love the cars pictured in this image of the U.S. Capitol.

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 40-45

I am posting these photos in the order I found them in the album, but that does not appear to be chronological. Several of the photos below belong with others posted previously.

Photo 40

See the train in the background? There is a helpful inscription on the back of the above photo:

Reverse of Photo 40

I did a Google Images search for “Susquehanna River Harrisburg Pa.” I wonder if the bridge in the background of the photo above is the same as that in several shots among the image results.

Photo 41

The above is such a pretty scene — would love to see it in color, especially those houses peeking around the bend.

Photo 42

Another shot of the train and the bridge.

Photo 43

Back at the lake. The little tot is having fun — the older boy? Not so much.

Photo 44

I love the boy’s bow tie.

Photo 45

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 34-39

Quite the variety of photos in this next set:

Photo 34

Things to love about this photo: the car; the boy’s hat; the dog (or is that a sheep?).

Photo 35

Yeah, these kids are barely tolerating having their photo taken.

Photo 36

The above is a dramatic shot, isn’t it? Anyone recognize it? If you’ve been to Gettysburg and seen Devil’s Rock (or Devil’s Den Rock), then you’ve seen it before.

Reverse of Photo 36

Love the knickers in the next photo:

Photo 37

This is a different vehicle than what is shown in the background of the first photo above. Perhaps they are posing in front of a new car?

Photo 38

Well, here’s an easy landmark to identify — the Reflecting Pool with the Washington Monument in the background.

Photo 39

Donald Trump’s hair’s got nothin’ on the kid on the left…

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 25-27

Wow, it’s been a long time since I’ve posted about this project. I’m happy to report, however, that I’ve finished scanning the images from Album 2. When we last left off, we were in Gettysburg and I’m pretty sure these next few images are from that same location as well.

Photo 25

Photo 26

Photo 27

Pretty timely given the anniversary of the Battle of Gettsyburg was this past weekend. Anyone been there more recently than the 1920s/1930s? I think it would be neat to find modern photos of the same scenes.

My First Jamboree — Part 3 (The Finale)

I was so torn as to which session to attend first thing Sunday morning. Megan Smolenyak? Stephen Morse? I opted for an update on RootsMagic 5 — I have RootsMagic, but admittedly don’t have a lot of time to devote to it. I selected it for maintaining a fully sourced family tree, so working with it is no quick exercise. I hoped the session would renew my¬† interest in the process. There were a lot of newbies in the crowd, so the discussion stayed pretty basic, but I was impressed nonetheless and was glad to hear that a reader is under development for the iPad, which should be released later this summer.

Next, I attended Thomas MacEntee’s session on Illinois ancestry. I didn’t get to go to FGS in Springfield, Ill., last year although I really wanted to because my Corley line called Illinois home for many years. His session was chock full of Illinois history and resources for seeking various kinds of records. I can’t wait to dig into all of the information he revealed to us.

The next session was by Curt Witcher and he was in full snark mode, which was really funny to watch. He gave us the perspective of the librarian/archivist on the receiving end of so many genealogists’ queries and their rambling stories. I’m not sure how many in the crowd were swayed to edit themselves next time they go to a repository seeking information, but his examples of research query letters (one 6 pages long!) were priceless.

The final session I attended was “The Frugal Curator” by Denise Levenick — I learned so much! Her how-tos for creating boxes and bags for preserving various family heirlooms will be so useful. I can’t wait for the release of her book later this summer.

Sadly, it was then time to finish packing and check out of my room. I made quick work of it, ordered room service for an early dinner and then turned in my room keys. I had about 2 hours before the shuttle would pick me up to return me to LAX. Luckily several genealogy bloggers remained in the lounge and so I had a great time hanging out with them until it was time to depart. Laughing with and learning from some great friends — what better way to end a conference?

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 21-24

Any American Pickers (or similar) fans out there? Can you make out or recognize the name on the little toy wagon below?

Photo 21

Anyone recognize this vista?

Photo 22

There’s a hint on the back:

Reverse of Photo 22 “York Haven June 1928″

Whoa, so I just Googled York Haven and found a Wikipedia entry about the area. Only 709 residents in the 2010 census? If it’s always been that small and there’s a connection to this album still living there… Well, the task doesn’t seem so monumental when the number is that small. However, if the town was much bigger in the earlier 20th century and the population then dwindled? Well, the family could be anywhere…

Another scene on the wagon:

Photo 23

Anyone been to Gettysburg lately? Recognize these rocks?

Photo 24

‘Cause they’re apparently in Gettysburg:

Reverse of Photo 24 “3 yrs old in Gettysburg”

I’m beginning to wonder about how this album and its cousin ended up in an Easton antique store. So, if the photo above was taken circa 1928, the babe pictured would be in their late 80s. Perhaps they have passed on and they never had children to whom these photos would mean something. It makes me sad. I do hope I can find a family member who cares enough to keep them. If not, I’m happy enough to keep them myself.