Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 100-105

This next set of photos confirms a connection to Maryland and features one of the best photos so far in the album.

Here we have the four gentlemen, still posing with their car:

Photo 100

And here’s a photo from another mystery location:

Photo 101

Next is one of the best photos so far. Yes, the guy on the left is blurry. It’s everything else that’s so excellent:

Photo 102

There are so many details in this photo! The Chevrolet ad in the upper left, the Coca-Cola ad down at the bottom, the wooden barrels. The African-American woman and the boy in waders and a big floppy hat greeting each other. The name of the business and the location information on the sign.

West Friendship is in Howard County, Maryland. I found Herbert H. Cross in the 1920 census, where he is listed as merchant. My guess is that these photos were taken as the guys in the previous photos drove to or from D.C. from Pennsylvania.

Here’s a photo of the album’s star posing on a bridge (note the variation in the code: 2B-1919):

Photo 103

And a photo of a baby, supposedly taken in 1919:

Photo 104

And here are the gentleman posing again in West Friendship in front of the car:

Photo 105

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 68-72

The next set of photos is kind of a hodge-podge, but a couple present some potentially identifiable landmarks.

Photo 68

Photo 69

I’m kind of curious about the person in the background of this photo. I believe it to be a guy, but it looks like he’s wearing a long robe. I believe we’ll see more photos of the infant the woman is holding in future photos.

Photo 70

This is a funny photo — what a weird backdrop. Wouldn’t you think they would want to stand in front of the stag instead of behind it? It kind of reminds me of the plastic animals in front of a couple all-you-can-eat buffets in New England.

Photo 71

I despaired that the top of the monument isn’t visible in this photo. She’s sitting on a canon pointed at the camera, so I figured this is a Civil War monument. Knowing that at least some of the photos in the album were taken in Pennsylvania, I searched for “Pennsylvania war monument pillar” on Google Images and met with success! Our album’s star is seated in front of the Penn Common Civil War Memorial in York! In this image, you can see some of the writing that is barely visible over her right shoulder above.

Photo 72

I give up. This photo has not one, not two, but THREE codes written on it (see, one is hidden behind one of the photo corners, top right?). There’s only two people in this photo, so presumably there goes my theory about the codes potentially relating to certain photo subjects. Argh!

“You’re Going to Employ Women” — U.S. War Department (1943)

One of my friends has had to clean out a recently deceased relative’s home and she has found several gems, including a copy of “You’re Going to Employ Women,” a pamphlet issued by the U.S. War Department in 1943 to its personnel offices (her relative worked in personnel at the Pentagon).

During the 1940s, with so many men off to war, women needed to be hired for positions traditionally held only by men, including in industries like manufacturing. This is the era that spawned the iconic Rosie the Riveter image.

The prospect of hiring women must have struck fear into the hearts of the many men left behind. Pamphlets like the one detailed here were created to helpfully guide them through the hiring and supervising of these creatures.

My friend allowed me to snap photos of the document, which includes such gems as:

“When training women, orient her more thoroughly than a man on health and safety rules, plant layout and production company policies, job techniques.”

“When training women, relate her job training to past experience, usually domestic—interpret machinery operation in terms of household and kitchen appliances.”

“Use a trained personnel woman. She understands women worker needs. She can give sympathetic attention to home problems. She can be told personal difficulties that would not be confided in a man.”

Unfortunately, not all of my photos of the booklet turned out that great, but here are the ones that did:

"When Hiring Women..."

"When Supervising Women..."

"For Victory -- Employ women intelligently."

The Ruins of St. John’s

The ruins of St. Johns along the Miles River. Photo taken from Unionville Road.

Drivers on the Eastern Shore of Maryland who take the Unionville Road bridge over the Miles River are treated to a view of Gothic church ruins. These are what is left of St. John’s Protestant Episcopal Church, which was finished in 1839. The money for the church was donated by Miles River Neck landowners who wanted a parish closer than the one in nearby St. Michaels, Md. It was one of the first Gothic Revival churches on the Eastern Shore.

The walls are made of granite. The church was deemed structurally unsound in 1900 and it continues to crumble. A photo of the ruins in “Where Land and Water Intertwine” (1984) shows a turret at the front of the church, but it has since fallen away.

Overhead view of St. Johns, courtesy of Google Maps

These ruins are not to be confused with Dundee Chapel, a circa 1720 church built further inland in Tunis Mills near what is now the intersection of Unionville Road and Todd’s Corner.

Information for this post came from “Where Land and Water Intertwine, An Archictectural History of Talbot County, Maryland” by Christopher Weeks (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984), pages 105-106.