Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 46-52

More riverside photos in this next set:

Photo 46

Photo 47

Any guesses as to what the contraption is in the image above?

Photo 48

The above might not make much sense, but will be explained a bit a couple of photos down.

Photo 49

I imagine that towers like these were quite a new phenomenon when the above photo was taken.

Photo 50

Anyone know which dam this might be?

Photo 51

Back in D.C. — a destination in Album 1. The above is a photo of the Lincoln Memorial, which opened to the public in 1922 (construction began in 1914). This information helps to date the photo.

Photo 52

Love the cars pictured in this image of the U.S. Capitol.

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 40-45

I am posting these photos in the order I found them in the album, but that does not appear to be chronological. Several of the photos below belong with others posted previously.

Photo 40

See the train in the background? There is a helpful inscription on the back of the above photo:

Reverse of Photo 40

I did a Google Images search for “Susquehanna River Harrisburg Pa.” I wonder if the bridge in the background of the photo above is the same as that in several shots among the image results.

Photo 41

The above is such a pretty scene — would love to see it in color, especially those houses peeking around the bend.

Photo 42

Another shot of the train and the bridge.

Photo 43

Back at the lake. The little tot is having fun — the older boy? Not so much.

Photo 44

I love the boy’s bow tie.

Photo 45

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 34-39

Quite the variety of photos in this next set:

Photo 34

Things to love about this photo: the car; the boy’s hat; the dog (or is that a sheep?).

Photo 35

Yeah, these kids are barely tolerating having their photo taken.

Photo 36

The above is a dramatic shot, isn’t it? Anyone recognize it? If you’ve been to Gettysburg and seen Devil’s Rock (or Devil’s Den Rock), then you’ve seen it before.

Reverse of Photo 36

Love the knickers in the next photo:

Photo 37

This is a different vehicle than what is shown in the background of the first photo above. Perhaps they are posing in front of a new car?

Photo 38

Well, here’s an easy landmark to identify — the Reflecting Pool with the Washington Monument in the background.

Photo 39

Donald Trump’s hair’s got nothin’ on the kid on the left…

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 28-33

Another timely post given the weather here in the U.S. “Hotter ‘n Hades” as my grandma used to say — makes you just want to jump in the nearest lake:

Photo 28

Hard to tell who the adult is in this photo, but I’m pretty confident it’s our star sporting the swimming fashion of the time period (compare to two photos down).

Photo 29

I *think* this is the same youngster pictured in the boat scene above.

Photo 30

That’s definitely our star on the left. I think that the older child has appeared before and I assume it’s her son. Here’s another photo of him (he’s on the right).

It kills me that our star had kids, who presumably had kids, who ditched these photos. Phooey.

Difficult to know if these next photos are of the same waterway where the two boat scenes above occurred — maybe they were taken on the way home. Anyone recognize these scenes?

Photo 31

Photo 32

Photo 33

The above is a neat shot — I love how the photographer captured the car in the distance. It’s kind of far away to try and figure out what type of vehicle it was, but here’s a crop of it anyhow:

Crop of vehicle in Photo 33

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 25-27

Wow, it’s been a long time since I’ve posted about this project. I’m happy to report, however, that I’ve finished scanning the images from Album 2. When we last left off, we were in Gettysburg and I’m pretty sure these next few images are from that same location as well.

Photo 25

Photo 26

Photo 27

Pretty timely given the anniversary of the Battle of Gettsyburg was this past weekend. Anyone been there more recently than the 1920s/1930s? I think it would be neat to find modern photos of the same scenes.

Heaven Has Gained One Hell of a Gardener

Yesterday, my family celebrated the life of my Aunt Teri, whom we lost in May after a long battle with cancer. She planned the event herself, down to the menu, and couldn’t have done so more perfectly. Several folks stood up and said beautiful words about Teri. I didn’t — I knew I would lose it if I tried. I think most folks who’ve met me know I’m more of a writer than a speaker anyhow.

Teri and I had become very close over the past several years. I made it a point to visit her in Winchester at least twice a year. I learned so much from her and I miss her terribly.

Not only was she my aunt, she was my godmother, drinking buddy, “big sister,” gardening/cooking inspiration, shopping pal, fellow daytrip explorer, crossword puzzle clue helper, backgammon instructor, music/movie sharer, family-secret spiller and kindred spirit.

Aunt Teri had a wicked grin and catching laugh that matched her sense of humor. She used to entertain all of us cousins when we were little by flaring her nostrils. She could curse like a sailor and inspired me in that regard too.

Aunt Teri (the Indian princess) and Me

As a youngster, I thought Aunt Teri was an Indian princess. She always tanned so dark and had such long, dark hair. I have so many fond memories of hanging with her on our family beach trips and visiting her out in the mountains of western Virginia.

One of Teri’s favorite photos, taken in her backyard in 2010.

Visiting Aunt Teri was always special — she had the most beautiful and productive garden. In recent years at her house in Winchester, I spent hours with her in the backyard, photographing bees among the lavender, picking raspberries and tomatoes, taunting birds who tried to do the same. We’d grill, drink more beer than probably is advisable, and chat for hours on end.

One of my favorite memories of hanging out with Aunt Teri was shortly after her divorce. She had just bought a house and had a ton of things to hang on the walls, but had never used a drill before. She had my grandfather’s old drill — the thing is entirely made out of metal and weighs about 10 pounds. I was cowed by it too, but I took her out back and had her practice drilling holes in the stump of an old tree. She was giddy with excitement over conquering the intimidating power tool.

The next time I came to visit her, her walls were full of prints, pictures and even a pot rack in her kitchen that she had installed herself.

Aunt Teri was an awe-inspiring cook. Her homemade pickles and brandied peaches couldn’t be beat. I still have one last jar of her canned green beans left. It will be a very special occasion when I decide to serve those.

The last time I saw Aunt Teri was on Mother’s Day. I had spent the weekend with her, helping her out around the house and garden. She was having trouble talking, but we still had a really great visit and I’m so thankful I got to see her then.

She was gone three days later. As is so often the case, we all thought we had more time…

I think of Aunt Teri every time I set foot in my own garden now. I so wish she were still here to quiz on how to take care of this plant and when to harvest that vegetable.

Heaven has gained one hell of a gardener.

Album Rescue Project: Album 2, Photos 21-24

Any American Pickers (or similar) fans out there? Can you make out or recognize the name on the little toy wagon below?

Photo 21

Anyone recognize this vista?

Photo 22

There’s a hint on the back:

Reverse of Photo 22 “York Haven June 1928″

Whoa, so I just Googled York Haven and found a Wikipedia entry about the area. Only 709 residents in the 2010 census? If it’s always been that small and there’s a connection to this album still living there… Well, the task doesn’t seem so monumental when the number is that small. However, if the town was much bigger in the earlier 20th century and the population then dwindled? Well, the family could be anywhere…

Another scene on the wagon:

Photo 23

Anyone been to Gettysburg lately? Recognize these rocks?

Photo 24

‘Cause they’re apparently in Gettysburg:

Reverse of Photo 24 “3 yrs old in Gettysburg”

I’m beginning to wonder about how this album and its cousin ended up in an Easton antique store. So, if the photo above was taken circa 1928, the babe pictured would be in their late 80s. Perhaps they have passed on and they never had children to whom these photos would mean something. It makes me sad. I do hope I can find a family member who cares enough to keep them. If not, I’m happy enough to keep them myself.