When Your 2nd Cousin Is Also Your Great Grand Uncle

Dear Reader: Do you think you are related to the individuals listed in this post? Please drop me a note! I love hearing from cousins and others researching my family!

I spent yesterday staying out of the way of carpenters doing work in my house while I enjoyed a day off from work. I also took a break from my client projects for a personal genealogy day. I was excited to track down several more distant cousins on my Tennessee side of the family and discovered a branch with multiple connections.

My 3rd great-grandfather Alfred T. Gourley had a granddaughter, Ann Gourley. She married into the McKeehan clan and had a son, Walter, who was my 2nd cousin, 2x removed. He married Sina Hayes, my great grand aunt (her brother, Willam Edmond, was my great-grandfather). This then made Walter McKeehan not only a distant cousin, but my great grand uncle, by marriage!

Alfred Gourley’s daughter was Mary L. Gourley, who married Daniel B. Crow. Their daughter, Della, married William Edmond Hayes.

How’d I Do in February? (Not Good.)

February has come and gone and I pretty much missed all of my personal monthly genealogy goals. I’m going to continue to blame my client projects, as they did take up all of my available genealogy time. Not that I’m complaining too much. I love my client projects!

First, let’s grade my progress. Here are the goals I set for myself for each month:

  • Processing one document/source per week (if not more) into my RootsMagic database. I didn’t touch RM this month — need to get back to it.
  • Writing at least one blog post per week. If you include my January recap post, my journaling post and a local history post, I only missed this mark by one. Phew!
  • Reading one genealogy book per month. I’m not reading much in the form of books lately and that needs to change. I blame House of Cards on Netflix and the availability of some of my favorite History Channel shows on Amazon Prime. And myself.
  • Exploring one new technology per month. Not genealogy-related, but I re-learned pivot tables in Excel at work this month. Does that count?
  • And taking one genealogy-related trip every two months. No February trips, but I did register for the Washington Family History Conference coming up in May!

Will I fare better in March? I’m going to be realistic and say no. I still have active client projects on-going and more work coming my way. My personal genealogy research is usually what feeds my blog, so if I don’t have time to research, I’m not going to blog. I am going to try and do better on the reading front.

News about The Hill in Easton

The Asbury AME church dominates the view down South Street in The Hill neighborhood in Easton.

The Asbury AME church dominates the view down South Lane in The Hill neighborhood in Easton.

There’s beginning to be a lot of buzz about The Hill, perhaps the oldest established African-American neighborhood in the country. Read three recent articles in the Star Democrat at the links below:

More details from ‘The Hill’ come to light

History on ‘The Hill’

More digs planned for ‘The Hill’

What’s more, the neighborhood’s two historic African-American churches, both of which hosted speeches by Frederick Douglass

when he visited Easton, are slated to receive preservation funds in Governor Martin O’Malley’s budget this year.

If you are interested in learning more about The Hill, donating towards the preservation and archaeological work, or getting involved as a volunteer, please visit the Historic Easton web site or send us an email!

How’d I Do in January?

Okay, okay, okay. It’s only February and I’m already behind on my January goals. But I do have good reasons.

First, let’s grade my progress. Here are the goals I set for myself for each month:

  • Processing one document/source per week (if not more) into my RootsMagic database. I got off to a good start the first week of January and added several items to RM. So, if you take the average, yes, I did add what comes out to one document per week.
  • Writing at least one blog post per week. I only posted a few times in January. Explanation on why below.
  • Reading one genealogy book per month. I read several chapters in a book on archival preservation, but didn’t quite make it all the way through. Not the book’s fault — I am taking the blame on this one. I need to really set aside more time for reading.
  • Exploring one new technology per month. I actually have this one covered! More on that below.
  • And taking one genealogy-related trip every two months. I didn’t go anywhere in January. We’ll have to see what February holds.

On to my excuses (I think they’re pretty good, actually):

1) I was without my laptop for two weeks — I dropped it off with a local company to be suped up with a new hard drive, operating system, Parallels, and to have my old hard drive turned into an external drive. Could I have done all this myself? Probably. But it would have taken me even longer and no guarantee that everything would be working right. Unfortunately, the guy assigned to work on my computer caught the flu and was out for several days. That and waiting for parts to arrive meant a lengthy delay before I got my computer back. I relied on my iPad in the interim, but I really don’t like blogging on it. The good news is I have the laptop back now and it’s super-fast and up-to-date.

2) I started a new job. I’ve been getting used to a new routine and schedule and my personal genealogy projects have been on the back burner since the middle of the month as a result.

3) I picked up new client genealogy work. For the better part of a week, when I got home from the day job, I was on the clock for a client. This left little time to work on my own genealogy. The good news is that the client wants me to do more work on the project and I had a couple more inquiries from other potential clients as well. The bad news? I will still be delaying work on my own genealogy into February, which will probably mean I won’t be posting much new material on the blog.

Now, for the new technology tool that I learned about this month. I needed to create multi-page PDFs for my client research project. You can do this in a program like Adobe Acrobat, but I found out about a different, free way to do so (as long as you have a Mac). You can use the Automator tool to create a script that will string together individual PDFs into one larger file. Read more about how to do it here.

Let’s see how I do in February!