For Wild Grandmas Everywhere

One of the presents my sister gave me at Christmas was this box of British biscuits:

Grandma Wild's Dark Chocolate Gingers

Everyone exclaimed when I opened it, of course, because our grandma was Grandma Wild. Just not the Grandma Wild pictured on the box above.

Alas, my Wilds weren’t British at all. They were German, so it would be pronounced “Vild” and their photos would be on boxes of lebkuchen instead.

Actually, the cookies above were very similar to lebkuchen, so maybe all these Wilds are related after all!

On another note, I really hope the title of this post doesn’t bring out the Twitter spammers. In a similar vein, I predict a whole new contingent of web traffic may be visiting shortly.

SNGFoS: Feelin’ Lucky

Here is my Saturday Night Genealogy Fun (on Sunday) post regarding last night’s challenge from Randy Seaver. The challenge:

“1) Go to http://www.google.com/ and enter a search term and click on the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button.

2) Try your name, your local society, favorite genealogy terms, whatever you want. Do at least three, and as many as you want if you have time. Be creative! Have fun!

3) What did you learn from this exercise?

4) Tell us about it in a blog post of your own, as a comment to this post, or as a Note or comment on Facebook.”

I started out by typing “missy corley” (w/o the quotes) and the result was my Twitter feed. Same result when I added quotes around the name. When I tried “melissa corley,” the result was a Melissa Corley on Facebook (but not me).

Typing in “bayside research services” brought me to my company homepage — yay!

Next, I typed in “corley genealogy,” which brought me to this page of a very distant relative (I’d found the page before when I first started researching my family.)

I then tried a similar search for “wild genealogy.” I really wondered if the term would be interpreted as an adjective and not a surname. To my surprise, it brought up a Cousin Connect page for the name. Good job, Google!

One interesting thing started happening as I continued different search terms. After the first few “Feeling Lucky” searches, I started hitting “Return” on my keypad rather than selecting “Feeling Lucky” on screen after I typed in each search term (force of habit). But Google must have figured out what I really meant to do, since it continued to bring up “Feeling Lucky” results rather than the traditional search results. Helpful, but kind of creepy at the same time.

I’m going to keep searching on some of the surnames in my family. As a librarian, we’re taught to shun Google for more trusted applications and search engines, but I don’t think it can or should be ignored completely, especially since it can help you connect with other real people searching on the same surnames. You just need to use a trained eye when reading the information they put on the web — is it sourced and credible? That’s the challenge with all things Google.

Memorial Monday: Ancestors Who Served

Dear Reader: Do you think you are related to the individuals listed in this post? Please drop me a note! I love hearing from cousins and others researching my family!

In honor of Memorial Day, here’s a quick run-down of my military ancestors:

My dad — US Army Reserves; Korean War, WWII (pictured left with his brother, Edmund, who served in the Navy)

Grandpa Wild — U.S. Army

Grandpa Corley — Iowa Infantry; Spanish-American War

Obediah Basham (my 4Ggrandfather) — Revolutionary War (I haven’t submitted a DAR application yet because I’m still collecting the necessary documentation, but others have)

I’m betting that I also had ancestors on one or both sides of the Civil War, but I haven’t collected/found proof of this yet.

SNGF: Matrilineal Line

Dear Reader: Do you think you are related to the individuals listed in this post? Please drop me a note! I love hearing from cousins and others researching my family!

Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings asks us to list our matrilineal line in this week’s Saturday Night Genealogy Fun task.

Here is mine:

Me
My Mom*
Grandma Wild*
Della (Crow) Hayes (1898-1985)
Mary (Gourley) Crow (1858-?)
Mary Ann (Barry) Gourley (?-?)
????????????????

Randy asks if we’ve had our mitochondrial DNA tested — I haven’t ventured down that path yet.

* I’ve read that in this age of rampant identity theft we’re discouraged from naming our parents/grandparents online, so I’m choosing not to identify my mom or grandmother here either fully by name or by vital dates. Am I being paranoid? I’d be curious to hear what other folks think about this.

Holiday Happenings

This is post #15 in the GeneaBloggers Advent Calendar of Christmas Memories and is dedicated to my cousins Shannon and Kevin.

My family is one of holiday birthdays. My cousin, Kevin, was born on Halloween. Another cousin, Shannon, on Christmas. I was born the day before Thanksgiving, and so I get a turkey dinner for my big day every five years or so.

I’ve never minded having a birthday near Thanksgiving. In fact, it’s been advantageous to have those days off to celebrate. I’ve always loved the certainty of having my family gathered around me on or near my birthday.

My birthday is just far enough away from Xmas to avoid the dreaded present combo that my cousin Shannon has certainly faced every year. She also has the advantage of having her birthday fall on a national holiday, but at what cost?

Kevin, of course, gets to have tons of candy and cake on his birthday. And I’m sure he’s had a few raucous costume parties along the way. ;o)

Love to all my Wild family cousins: Cindy, Lee, Kevin, Kelly, Shannon and Daniel! And if there are any CORLEY cousins out there that wish to identify themselves, drop me a note!

Tombstone Tuesday: Fridolin Wild and Kin

Dear Reader: Do you think you are related to the individuals listed in this post? Please drop me a note! I love hearing from cousins and others researching my family!

After my Surname Saturday post this weekend about my WILD roots, I did some more digging and found gravesite photos and information for Fridolin Wild, his wife and her parents in San Antonio’s City Cemetery. I’m really excited about these finds, as they provide a lot of information. The records on the Find A Grave web site link to children and siblings as well. I was sure to leave a thank-you note for the photographer.

24. Fridolin Wild

25. Lina (Hoyer) Wild

50. Julius Hoyer (Lina’s father)

51. Sophie Hoyer (Lina’s mother)

The latter two are especially rich in information about where the Hoyer’s came from in Europe. I realize that this all needs to be verified through other records, but I’m excited by this find nonetheless. I’m beginning to think a trip to San Antonio someday is in order.

Surname Saturday: I’m a real WILD child (Virginia, Texas, Germany)

Dear Reader: Do you think you are related to the individuals listed in this post? Please drop me a note! I love hearing from cousins and others researching my family!

My mother’s maiden name was Wild, and I’m sure you can only imagine the jokes made about her and her three sisters as they grew up.

This particular name has German roots. I’ve traced back the line to Aibling, Germany, so far. Rumor has it that we’re somehow related to the original brewer’s of Becker Bier in St. Ingbert, Germany (now a Karlsberg brewery).

My mom and her sisters were Army brats and moved all over the world, but they spent a lot of time stateside in Northern Virginia, where my aunts still live, and in Texas, which is where our ancestors originally settled after leaving Bavaria.

Here are my Wild roots, in all their Ahnentafel glory:

2. Marcia Lea Wild (1949-2003)
6. Col. Herman Bennett Wild (1913-1978; Army accountant — he and my grandma met on the job at the Pentagon)
12. Herman Wild (1876-1928; lived in San Antonio Texas all his life, near as I can tell)
24. Fridolin Wild (1844-?: the German immigrant, from Aibling)

I found Fridolin and the elder Herman in San Antonio directories in the late 19th century, both working as salesmen.

My goal is to trace Fridolin’s family as far back as I can. In my research today, I discovered that his wife’s surname was HOYER and that her parents immigrated from Germany as well.