The Hill Project Presents: “A Stroll Down Memory Lane”

I hope those in the Easton area can attend this event on March 31 (click on the poster for a larger view):

I’m really looking forward to learning more about this area from the residents and to participate in the walking tour. I’ll post a follow-up blog post when the event is over!

Learn more about The Hill here and/or visit the Historic Easton web site.

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 137-143

Pretty dress and pretty hat in the next photos:

Photo 137

Photo 138

I think we’re back in the backyard for this next photo:

Photo 139

An afternoon in the park with her boyfriend?

Photo 140

Photo 141

Photo 142

And, back at home with her gal pal:

Photo 143

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 131-136

Here’s one more graduation day photo before moving on:

Photo 131

We’ve graduated from the hammock to a swing in this next photo:

Photo 132

Here’s our star holding a doll who’s holding a doll:

Photo 133

She looks a bit chilly in this next one:

Photo 134

Sitting on the steps:

Photo 135

Having some fun in the snow:

Photo 136

I’m going to posit that the Y in the code in a couple of the photos above stands for York (as in York, Penn.).

History of Mulberry Point

Recently, I was hired to do a property history for a new property owner’s birthday present. The 18th-century home and land I researched were purchased last year for conversion into a vacation rental. Below is the land’s history and some photos of the property (click on the images for larger versions).

Waterside view of Mulberry Point. The two-story porch was added during a recent renovation.

The property today known as Mulberry Point can be traced back to the mid 1660s. It has seen many owners and names over the years. Residents and owners participated in the War of 1812 and the Revolutionary War. Some residents were slave owners. Several residents died on the property and at least one was buried there.

View from down the dock on Broad Creek, originally known as Second Creek, near Bozman, Md., in Talbot County.

The ownership history of the waterfront property, located on Broad Creek near Bozman, Md., is quite complicated — pieces of the property were split up and reunited over the years, in different configurations.

The main home was built in 1752 and has undergone extensive renovations. The windows and the front door, with its transom, lead me to call this a Georgian-style home.

A view of the front of Mulberry Point. Tax records show the house was built in 1752.

One of the outbuildings may be even older. Check out the details on the doors of this shed below.

That's a neat old gas pump too!

The Harrison family held the land for the longest period of time. Margaret (Harrison) Benson and her husband George* sold the land to a different family in 1865 for the sum of $4,325. It has changed hands many times since.

Margaret Benson was the daughter of James Inloes Harrison. The Bensons took over the land from Harrison’s sister, Mrs. Ann Caulk, widow of William Caulk.

The Bensons were slave owners, as evidenced by an exchange of slaves between the Harrisons and the Bensons in the distribution of the estate of James Inloes Harrison. Ann Caulk’s will, which distributed slaves to her heirs, was disputed by heirs of her brother, James. In the resulting ruling, Margaret Benson was awarded the following slaves: Thomas who was 28 years old and valued at $800; a 10-year-old slave named Harriet, valued at $400; a 24-year-old woman named Molly, valued at $250; an infant also named Molly (6 months old), valued at $50; as well as another 10-year-old girl named Frances, valued at $350.

Since the Bensons sold the property in 1865, one can imagine that when they had to give up their slaves after the Civil War, they might not have been able to maintain the property anymore, forcing them to sell. It’s just a theory, but it fits the timeframe.

James Inloes Harrison died at Mulberry Point 30 October 1855 (he is buried in Bozman Cemetery). Arthur Harrison, the son of James Inloes Harrison, was buried at Mulberry Point and his tombstone was eventually found in the water on the north side of the house by the children of more recent owners.

Ann Caulk and James Inloes Harrison were the children of Thomas Harrison and Elizabeth Inloes. Ann Caulk died in 1854 and is buried at Mulberry Point. Her husband William was a major in the War of 1812 and was known as a prosperous farmer. William served under General Perry Benson in the 26th Talbot Regiment. William resided at a plantation by the name of Lostock near Mulberry Point. Ann Caulk presumably moved to Mulberry Point after the death of her husband.

Ann Caulk was left Mulberry Point by Samuel Harrison, her uncle. Samuel Harrison obtained the land from William Harrison in 1825 for $1,940.50, but it does not appear that he lived there. At that time, the pieces of land were called Harrison’s Security and Freeman’s Rest & Vacancy Added, totaling about 167 acres, as well as part of a tract called Harrison’s Partnership.

The Harrisons obtained these lands from Robert Haddaway in the late 1790s. Broad Creek at that time was known as Second Creek. It appears that tracts by the name of Haddaway’s Discovery and Hap Hazard were located to the south of what is now Mulberry Point.

Detail of circa-1900 map of Talbot County.

The lands were passed down to Haddaway by his parents, William Webb Haddaway and Frances (Harrison) Haddaway, who obtained them through the will of her father, John Harrison.

Robert Haddaway was a house carpenter according to land records (he also is listed as a farmer in a mortgage to Thomas Harrison). The main residence at Mulberry Point was built in 1752, according to tax records. The owners at that time were Robert Haddaway’s parents — might he have helped to build the structure?

William Webb Haddaway served in the Revolutionary War in the 38th Maryland Battalion, eventually achieving the rank of colonel. He was a slave owner, as the 1776 Maryland Colonial Census lists several blacks in his household.

John Harrison’s will of 17 July 1744 gave his lands to Frances Harrison (William Webb Haddaway’s wife). John appears to have been willed the land by his grandfather, Robert Harrison, in 1718.

Robert Harrison inherited lands called Prouses Point and Haphazard from his wife, Alice Oliver, when her mother, Mary Oliver, died. The portion containing Hap Hazard appears to have been given to John Harrison’s brother James and is to the south of what is now Mulberry Point. Prouses Point appears to have evolved into what is known today as Mulberry Point.

Mary Oliver had been married to James Oliver, who obtained Prouses Point from George Prouse in 1668. Prouse had the land surveyed in 1664 at 100 acres. It appears he was an immigrant to Maryland and the original owner of the land patent for the property.

*It’s possible that Margaret Benson’s husband George Benson was the great-grandson of Perry Benson, an officer in the Revolutionary War and War of 1812. George Benson’s father was Robert F. Benson (born in 1807). Perry Benson’s son James had a son by the name of Robert, also born in 1807. It is possible he was the father of George Benson.

This aerial photo was taken in 1981:

(Image courtesy of the Historical Society of Talbot County)/HSTC Catalog No. 1981.019.019509

Sources:

Ancestry.com. “Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s.” Record for George Prouse. (http://ancestry.com : accessed 8 February 2012).

Ancestry.com. “Maryland Colonial Census, 1776.” Record for William Webb Haddaway. (http://ancestry.com : accessed 8 February 2012).

Covington, Antoinette H. Harrisons of Talbot County. Tilghman, Md.: 1971.

Leonard, R. Bernice. Talbot County Maryland Land Records 1740-1745. St. Michaels, Md.: 1987.

Maryland, Talbot County. Distributions 1858-81, Liber NR 5, 33, distribution of the estate of James I. Harrison 25 Oct 1858. Circuit Court of Talbot County, Easton. Maryland State Archives microfilm, CR 90,289.

Seymour, Helen. Caulk Family of Talbot County, Maryland. St. Michaels, Md.: 2002.

Seymour, Helen. Thomas Harrison Descendants. St. Michaels, Md.: 2003.

Stewart, Carole. Caulk Family Genealogy, 2007.

Talbot County, Maryland, Deed Records, Circuit Court of Talbot County, Easton. Digital images. MDLandRec.net. http://MDLandRec.Net

Talbot County Free Library. “Map of Talbot County, Maryland.” Maryland Room — The Starin Collection – Talbot County. (http://www.tcfl.org : accessed 12 January 2012).

Album Resuce Project: Album 1, Photos 126-130

Puppy!

Photo 126

More poses of the girls together:

Photo 127

That’s quite a house in the background…

Photo 128

On to a new series of photos. I think from our star’s graduation day!

Photo 129

Photo 130

She’s absolutely swimming in that gown, isn’t she. Now, the question is, is this a high school graduation or college?

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 120-125

Hmmm… Might this be the album’s star with her beau?

Photo 120

Unfortunately, the folks to the left are fading out of this next photo:

Photo 121

This next photo has some fading as well:

Photo 122

Here’s a gentleman I don’t believe we’ve seen before with the album’s star and her friend:

Photo 123

Another interesting pose. I think they were hamming it up for the camera:

Photo 124

Definitely having fun:

Photo 125

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 116-119

Fancy hats and fur in the next few photos:

Photo 116

Check out the little dolls our album’s star and her friend are holding up in the next photo:

Photo 117

The caption on this next photo shows it was taken in Harrisburg (perhaps that is related to the photo’s code…):

Photo 118: Harrisburg

Quite a group pose in this next shot:

Photo 119

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 112-115

Anyone familiar with this type of uniform/weapon? From the web research, I did, I think this is a U.S. Army uniform from WWI:

Photo 112

The following date is written on the back:

Reverse of Photo 112: Nov 11, 1918

The photo below has the same code:

Photo 113

Reverse of Photo 113: April 10, 1919

Below is another fun shot of the album’s star with her friends:

Photo 114

Anyone recognize this bridge?

Photo 115

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 106-111

We have an identified subject in Photo 106:

Photo 106

Reverse of Photo 106: Fredinand G/T? Law about 14 years old

I double-checked the physical photo and it is cut off at the top as pictured in the scan above. I didn’t find records for a Ferdinand G. or T. Law. There is a Ferdinand Law from Ohio in the 1920 census. I suppose that could be this Ferdinand — perhaps he is a relative of our album’s star, who is based in Pennsylvania.

Below is the album’s star with an older woman, whom I don’t think we’ve seen before:

Photo 107

Below are photos with a baby who is 4 months old, if the captions are accurate (no notes on the back this time). Perhaps the same baby who appeared at the age of 7 weeks old earlier in the album?

Photo 108

Photo 109

Baby in a basket:

Photo 110

And…

Photo 111

Those who are watching the codes will note that the baby photos in this post have two different letters, E and H. The previous baby photos in the album also had E and H in the codes. The 6- to 7-week-old baby photos shown earlier had the letter H in the codes.

Also note that in the photo above, the age of the baby is written in pencil and the code is added in ink.

Album Rescue Project: Album 1, Photos 100-105

This next set of photos confirms a connection to Maryland and features one of the best photos so far in the album.

Here we have the four gentlemen, still posing with their car:

Photo 100

And here’s a photo from another mystery location:

Photo 101

Next is one of the best photos so far. Yes, the guy on the left is blurry. It’s everything else that’s so excellent:

Photo 102

There are so many details in this photo! The Chevrolet ad in the upper left, the Coca-Cola ad down at the bottom, the wooden barrels. The African-American woman and the boy in waders and a big floppy hat greeting each other. The name of the business and the location information on the sign.

West Friendship is in Howard County, Maryland. I found Herbert H. Cross in the 1920 census, where he is listed as merchant. My guess is that these photos were taken as the guys in the previous photos drove to or from D.C. from Pennsylvania.

Here’s a photo of the album’s star posing on a bridge (note the variation in the code: 2B-1919):

Photo 103

And a photo of a baby, supposedly taken in 1919:

Photo 104

And here are the gentleman posing again in West Friendship in front of the car:

Photo 105